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Automation insights and productivity tips from LEAPWORK.

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How to Automate ServiceNow: Test and Process Automation

Heavy customization combined with mandatory upgrades put a lot of pressure on functional and regression testing of ServiceNow implementations around the world.

ServiceNow has become one of the world's most popular and easy‑to‑use service management solutions and is named by Gartner as a Magic Quadrant leader for the third year in a row. The software is well-known for being incredibly flexible and can be customized to support virtually any IT service management requirements in modern enterprises, including tackling difficult legacy processes. And because it's all in the cloud, upgrades happen automatically so the latest capabilities are available without administrative overhead.

In this short demonstration video, I show how easy it is to perform test automation on ServiceNow with LEAPWORK. It's not an engineering exercise, there's no code involved and there is no limit to how complex processes can be.

 


Most enterprise software share the same structural challenges for test automation with existing tools: They rely on complicated technical implementations, nested iframes, dynamically changing the DOM and performing a lot of behind-the-scenes XHR requests. ServiceNow is no exception, and this has made it very difficult to test with tools such as Selenium without writing extensive amounts of code.

LEAPWORK lets you easily overcome these complexities, including navigating nested iframes, waiting for XHR requests and DOM changes and creating reusable components on the fly. In fact, it almost feels like LEAPWORK was made to automate ServiceNow.

But wait, there's more! Using ServiceNow to trigger and run test automation in LEAPWORK is also very straight-forward because LEAPWORK is built on an open REST API. So here's an example of how to use ServiceNow to manage an automation process, and have incidents automatically created if test automation cases fail.

 



I built this example from scratch in a few hours time on a snappy ServiceNow instance provided by our good friends at BusinessNow. I'll be honest and admit half that time was spent getting date conversion working in Javascript. Someone with more JS skills than me could probably do it in a few minutes.

The bottom line is, if you are working with ServiceNow and want to either get started with test automation or want to use ServiceNow as the management platform, it's super easy to do with LEAPWORK.

Get the facts: Learn About Dynamics Automation

Download the fact sheet to gain more in-depth knowledge about automating with ServiceNow. In the sheet, you will learn about standard components and how to integrate it with your CI/CD pipeline.

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Everything you need for ServiceNow automation

Check out LEAPWORK's tutorials, out-of-the-box samples, and educational resources to get started with ServiceNow automation.

Claus Topholt
Claus Topholt
CTO and co-founder of LEAPWORK.

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