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How to Test on Remote Computers

Test automation is all about stretching your limited resources to do more in a shorter amount of time.

One very effective way to do that with LEAPWORK is to create your test automation cases once and then run them on endless repeat on one or more remote computers -- for instance in the Amazon EC2 or Microsoft Azure clouds or on virtual servers in your own network infrastructure.

We recommend that you install the LEAPWORK Agent (which is the executable that actually runs the tests) on one or more separate computers and then run your cases there instead of on your local computer. That way, you are not inconvenienced when LEAPWORK opens applications or uses the mouse or keyboard -- and you can get more done, faster.

The following diagram shows one way you could configure LEAPWORK to work:

LEAPWORK architecture with Studio, Controller and multiple runtime Agents

In this example, you could have Studio installed on your own computer or laptop, while the Controller could be installed on a server and the Agent could be installed on two or more other computers where the tests would actually be run.

LEAPWORK makes it very easy for you to setup a schedule that will execute any number of test automation cases on remote environments (agents). This is made possible by the built-in remote control protocol, which works a bit like Windows Remote Desktop or VNC:

Automated testing with remote control on a cloud server using LEAPWORK

Claus Topholt
Claus Topholt
CTO and co-founder of LEAPWORK.

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